DNA Paternity Test Info

DNA Paternity Test Info

  • DNA-Paternity Tests
  • 1. Personal DNA Paternity Test

    Determines if the tested man or tested woman is the biological father or biological mother of the tested child. The Personal DNA Paternity Test is exactly what its name implies - used in situations where results are needed only for personal knowledge. For more formal needs, such as a complying with a court-order or trying to secure Social Security or military benefits, a Legal DNA Paternity Test is usually required.
  • 2. Legal DNA Paternity Test

    Determines if the tested man or tested woman is the biological father or biological mother of the tested child. Unlike a Personal DNA Paternity Test, this test also involves collecting valid personal identification of each participant and following a strict chain of custody documentation procedure. This enables the test results to be admissible as evidence in a courtroom or serve other legal purposes.
  • 3. Duo Grandparentage DNA Test

    Whenever an alleged father is unavailable for testing, a Duo Grandparentage DNA test can help answer if the both the grandfather and grandmother are related to the grandchild.
  • 4. Single Grandparentage Test

    Whenever an alleged father or mother is unavailable for testing, a Single Grandparentage DNA test can help answer if one of the grandparents is related to the grandchild.
  • 5. Full Sibling DNA Test

    Determines whether two (or more) individuals share both parents in common.
  • 6. Half Sibling DNA Test

    Determines whether two (or more) individuals share one parent in common.
  • 7. Avuncular DNA Test

    Determines the likelihood of a biological relationship between an Uncle or Aunt and the child tested.
  • 8. Twin Zygosity Test

    Determines whether twins (or triplets, etc.) are identical or fraternal.
  • 9. Immigration DNA Paternity Testing

    Determines whether there is a biological relationship between the Petitioner and the Beneficiary going through the immigration process when customary evidence (e.g., birth certificate) is deemed insufficient or inconclusive.